Showing posts with label git. Show all posts
Showing posts with label git. Show all posts

Thursday, 9 August 2012

Lessons learned from the coal face of git repositories


I've just been going through a bit of pain, setting up a git repo.

A git repo is a place to put your open source project. It allows users to get hold of your project, contribute to it and create their own version from it. A git repo also gives you useful things like change control for your project.

GitHub have tried to make the process simple with good help, but there are a few do's and don'ts which I discovered along the way so here, I compose my learning as a reminder to myself. Hopefully we'll all feel the benefit.

I'm going to assume that you have already gone through all the pain of creating a GitHub account. There are many places on the web you can learn how to do this. I'm also assuming that you have logged in to GitHub and that you have reached the homepage of your account. Finally, I'll have to assume you've set git up on your server so that all the local software is in place.

1. It's best to create a new repository from GitHub. Not, as they recommend from your server. Start by clicking the 'New repository' buutton.
2. I recommend you name the repository as the directory on your server. Do not take the option to create the README file. By avoiding it, you will be provided with some starting commands, which I recommend you save to a text file. They'll look something like this:
Create a new repository on the command line
touch README.md
git init
git add README.md
git commit -m "first commit"
git remote add origin https://github.com/yourusername/yourdirectory.git
git push -u origin master

Push an existing repository from the command line
git remote add origin https://github.com/yourusername/yourdirectory.git
git push -u origin master

3. Follow the instructions provided by GitHub within the directory on your server.
4. You may already have a project ready to go up. Then you'll need to do:
git add *.*
git commit -m "your comments"
git push origin master
Followed by:
git add .
git commit -m "your comments"
git push origin master
5. Now you're ready to start pushing your updates. Make some changes. Test that you're happy with them on your server. Now commit using:
git add *.*
git commit -m "your comments"
git push origin master
6. Let's say you messed up (each and every minute of every day in my case (yes, even when I'm sleeping)) and you want to remove a file you've committed. First delete it from your server then:
git add . -A
git commit -m "removed some files"
git push origin master

Have fun with GitHub!